participation

A Convincing Vision

Downes, S. (2010). New Technology Supporting Informal Learning. Journal of Emerging Technologies in Web Intelligence 2(1). pp. 27-33. Retrieved March 13, 2010 from http://www.academypublisher.com/ojs/index.php/jetwi/article/view/02012733. Downes considers the intersection of games and social networks and examines the implications for the design of future learning environments. His initial argument—that games and simulations represent episodic events—is based on… Continue reading A Convincing Vision

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How Computer Games Help Children Learn – Chapter 6

Shaffer, D. (2006). How Computer Games Help Children Learn. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. The final chapter brings out several challenges in designing epistemic games: games are built on simulations which are inevitably simplified (and thus distorted) views of the world simulations without a community of practice and without the opportunity for reflection and feedback offer… Continue reading How Computer Games Help Children Learn – Chapter 6

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How Computer Games Help Children Learn – Chapter 2

Shaffer, D. (2006). How Computer Games Help Children Learn. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. The Digital Zoo game starts to tie together game qualities with authentic professions (in this case, mechanical engineering). The game is a design simulation with no right answer; goals are realistic tasks (such as build a bridge), and levels are introduced through… Continue reading How Computer Games Help Children Learn – Chapter 2

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Instance-based and rule-based learning

Taatgen, Niels A. and Wallach, Dieter. "Whether Skill Acquisition is Rule or Instance Based is determined by the Structure of the Task." Cognitive Science Quarterly: 2.2 (2002). 163 -204. Summary The traditional view of skill acquisition as "a gradual transition from behavior based on declarative rules in the form of examples and instruction towards general… Continue reading Instance-based and rule-based learning

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Simulations in Online Instruction

Rude-Parkins, C., et. al. “Applying Gaming and Simulation Techniques to the Design of Online Instruction.” Innovate Online 2.2 (December, 2005 - January, 2006). Retrieved from the Web 02/06/2009 at http://innovateonline.info/index.php?view=article&id=70&action=article (requires login). Summary Characteristics which distinguish an Army training simulation are described: using scenarios, keeping score, and allowing learners to control timing. Each lesson begins… Continue reading Simulations in Online Instruction